The Azimuth Project on Github

I have created Azimuth Project as an organization on Github. Not much to see there yet, but if anyone is interested in being added as an owner then let me know your Github account names.

For those that haven't used it, Github is a cool 'social coding' website kind of like Google code (where most of the Azimuth Code Project code is kept now) or SourceForge (if anyone remembers that), but with a very enjoyable and slick user experience. Using it can turn even the meekest Grandmother (used to stuffing all of her code under her mattress) into a software configuration and versioning demon overnight!

Furthermore, it appeals to those like Jim Stuttard, myself, and some others on this forum who are used to the git utility.

This isn't an attempt to undermine any of the fine effort that has gone into the existing Google code repository, but rather to complement it with something we may enjoy using alongside.

Comments

  • 1.

    The first project I have planned are some web scripts to help Jim Stuttard negotiate the minefield that is web-server deployment. My intent is that the script will:

    • pull down peoples code from a variety of sources (eg github project, google code project, etc)
    • do basic sanity checking and build the code (if necessary)
    • aggregate all the results under one versioned/dated directory which will be viewable online on Jim's server

    (The idea is that we can then vet the results of our coding efforts in the context of what everyone else has contributed, and then see the whole shebang published with minimal effort on Jim's (or anyone else's) part, all without risk of breaking what we currently have displayed to the world. At suitable junctures and after we have checked for breakages etc, someone (eg Jim who owns the server account) can link to the latest version so releasing it to the world at large. More on this later...)

    Comment Source:The first project I have planned are some web scripts to help Jim Stuttard negotiate the minefield that is web-server deployment. My intent is that the script will: * pull down peoples code from a variety of sources (eg github project, google code project, etc) * do basic sanity checking and build the code (if necessary) * aggregate all the results under one versioned/dated directory which will be viewable online on Jim's server (The idea is that we can then vet the results of our coding efforts in the context of what everyone else has contributed, and then see the whole shebang published with minimal effort on Jim's (or anyone else's) part, all without risk of breaking what we currently have displayed to the world. At suitable junctures and after we have checked for breakages etc, someone (eg Jim who owns the server account) can link to the latest version so releasing it to the world at large. More on this later...)
  • 2.

    I've been using the github gist facility, which has worked well for me. I'm working on some examples from the Feinberg "Lectures on Chemical Reaction Networks", which John suggested looking at. I've added these examples as gists on my own github account. It would be nice to add some of these to the Azimuth Project account.

    According to github: "Gist is a simple way to share snippets and pastes with others. All gists are git repositories, so they are automatically versioned, forkable and usable as a git repository."

    Allan: Could you please add me (kenwebb) as an owner.

    Ken

    Comment Source:I've been using the github [gist](https://gist.github.com/) facility, which has worked well for me. I'm working on some examples from the Feinberg "Lectures on Chemical Reaction Networks", which John suggested looking at. I've added these examples as gists on my own github account. It would be nice to add some of these to the Azimuth Project account. According to github: "Gist is a simple way to share snippets and pastes with others. All gists are git repositories, so they are automatically versioned, forkable and usable as a git repository." Allan: Could you please add me (kenwebb) as an owner. Ken
  • 3.

    Great stuff,

    I agree with all of it. Watch out: it's getting dangerously near to a spec :)

    Please add jimstutt.

    Many thanks for the help

    Comment Source:Great stuff, I agree with all of it. Watch out: it's getting dangerously near to a spec :) Please add jimstutt. Many thanks for the help
  • 4.

    Added Ken and Jim as owners -- you can publicize your membership there now and create repos etc.

    Comment Source:Added Ken and Jim as owners -- you can publicize your membership there now and create repos etc.
  • 5.

    Jim wrote:

    I agree with all of it. Watch out: it's getting dangerously near to a spec :)

    Ulp! Well let me know if you get some code checked-in that I can try out with Part I of said spec :)

    Comment Source:Jim wrote: > I agree with all of it. Watch out: it's getting dangerously near to a spec :) Ulp! Well let me know if you get some code checked-in that I can try out with Part I of said spec :)
  • 6.
    edited August 2012

    The various default Snap servers which I've built keep crashing after a few hours. The bluehost server installations are reliable and there is none of my code in the defaults so it must be the abnormal way I've had to build them. Except on this server, all Snap instances build straight OOTB but I've asked in the project README file for somebody to try and check this out as there's just been a Snap upgrade. README contains my take on some of the gruesome details.

    Comment Source:The various default Snap servers which I've built keep crashing after a few hours. The bluehost server installations are reliable and there is none of my code in the defaults so it must be the abnormal way I've had to build them. Except on this server, all Snap instances build straight OOTB but I've asked in the project README file for somebody to try and check this out as there's just been a Snap upgrade. [README](http://stuttard.org) contains my take on some of the gruesome details.
  • 7.

    I mentioned using github gists above. It turns they're not available with an organization account.

    Comment Source:I mentioned using github gists above. It turns they're not available with an organization account.
  • 8.

    Jim wrote:

    I agree with all of it. Watch out: it's getting dangerously near to a spec :)

    I've been investigating Fabric, a deployment tool which can handle the steps I mentioned above over SSH and which should also appeal to the Pythonistas among us. That said, I'm off on vacation in a couple of days. Will pick this up when I return.

    Comment Source:Jim wrote: > I agree with all of it. Watch out: it's getting dangerously near to a spec :) I've been investigating [Fabric](http://docs.fabfile.org/en/1.4.3/index.html), a deployment tool which can handle the steps I mentioned above over SSH and which should also appeal to the Pythonistas among us. That said, I'm off on vacation in a couple of days. Will pick this up when I return.
  • 9.

    Great! If anyone wants some leadership, just tell me what you want me to tell you to do.

    Actually I will soon start trying to publicize our climate modelling work so far and come up with the next steps. But the computer aspects are best left to all of you!

    Comment Source:Great! If anyone wants some leadership, just tell me what you want me to tell you to do. <img src = "http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/emoticons/tongue2.gif" alt = ""/> Actually I will soon start trying to publicize our climate modelling work so far and come up with the next steps. But the computer aspects are best left to all of you!
  • 10.

    Hi Allan,

    Fabric looks great. Have you come across Travis CI? I think I should find out how it compares with Jenkins and how we might possibly build an integrated VCS-CI system. Any ideas? I'd like to come up with some kind of rolling upgrade plan for various servers and compilers.

    Comment Source:Hi Allan, Fabric looks great. Have you come across Travis CI? I think I should find out how it compares with Jenkins and how we might possibly build an integrated VCS-CI system. Any ideas? I'd like to come up with some kind of rolling upgrade plan for various servers and compilers.
  • 11.
    edited September 2012

    John wrote:

    tell me what you want me to tell you to do.

    FWIW I'd say brainstorm your ideal system regardless of feasibility, perhaps for implementation in the next 12 months; then decide what Pareto-optimal chunks of it you'd like to see initially by, say, Dec 3, 2012.

    HTH.

    Comment Source:John wrote: > tell me what you want me to tell you to do. FWIW I'd say brainstorm your ideal system regardless of feasibility, perhaps for implementation in the next 12 months; then decide what Pareto-optimal chunks of it you'd like to see initially by, say, Dec 3, 2012. HTH.
  • 12.
    edited September 2012

    Regardless of feasibility? Okay, that makes it easier. This will be pretty vague, though, since I'm just brainstorming.

    I'd like a setup where:

    1) Users can easily write programs in a variety of languages, especially programs that run on a web browser and take input via sliders, etc. and give graphical or pictorial output.

    2) Users can easily see these programs and create new ones by modifying existing ones.

    3) Azimuth Blog articles and expository webpages can include these programs.

    4) People who post articles on the Azimuth Blog, or write expository webpages, can easily see the code for articles and webpages created by other people, and copy and modify that code, without being able to modify those other articles and webpages.

    In short, my dream is to get a thriving ecosystem of people who learn and explain science related to environmental problems, climate, biology, etcetera, with the help of software that other people can interact with on their browsers.

    Comment Source:Regardless of feasibility? Okay, that makes it easier. This will be pretty vague, though, since I'm just brainstorming. I'd like a setup where: 1) Users can easily write programs in a variety of languages, especially programs that run on a web browser and take input via sliders, etc. and give graphical or pictorial output. 2) Users can easily see these programs and create new ones by modifying existing ones. 3) Azimuth Blog articles and expository webpages can include these programs. 4) People who post articles on the Azimuth Blog, or write expository webpages, can easily see the code for articles and webpages created by other people, and copy and modify that code, without being able to modify those other articles and webpages. In short, my dream is to get a thriving ecosystem of people who learn and explain science related to environmental problems, climate, biology, etcetera, with the help of software that other people can interact with on their browsers.
  • 13.

    By the way, some similar things are happening now at the Khan Academy. I blogged about what happens when a circle rolls inside another circle, and Rahul Sidhu posted a program that illustrates this. It's written using JavaScript and Processing.js, it runs online, and it's easy to modify. So when someone asked for a slight change in the program, Rahul was able to post that one too - but in theory anyone could have done it.

    Since I have no pride, I wouldn't mind joining Khan Academy and posting our stuff there... but our emphasis here is a bit different, so maybe it's better to do things ourselves. Not sure! They're getting lots more money than us, that's for sure.

    Comment Source:By the way, some similar things are happening now at the Khan Academy. I blogged about what happens when a circle rolls inside another circle, and Rahul Sidhu posted a [program that illustrates this](http://www.khanacademy.org/cs/rolling-circles-2/1033304147). It's written using JavaScript and Processing.js, it runs online, and it's easy to modify. So when someone asked for a slight change in the program, Rahul was able to [post that one too](http://www.khanacademy.org/cs/rolling-circles-3/1033677731) - but in theory anyone could have done it. Since I have no pride, I wouldn't mind joining Khan Academy and posting our stuff there... but our emphasis here is a bit different, so maybe it's better to do things ourselves. Not sure! They're getting lots more money than us, that's for sure.
  • 14.

    John mused:

    Since I have no pride, I wouldn’t mind joining Khan Academy and posting our stuff there…

    I've been thinking about this a lot. Not necessarily Khan Academy.. but to use your recent 4D series on Google+ as an example, all of the visual material there was made freely available at no expense (either to you, or the cause of 4D geometry in general!)

    It is a balancing act to decide whether to expend effort to provide infrastructure like the Khan Academy has ourselves, or to gain leverage from the efforts of others. Staffan for example has been keen to utilize the latest served-hosted interactive 'notebooks' from the SAGE community. On the other hand Jim Stuttard is aligning himself with a smart set of Haskell libraries on his own server. Some of your more established friends like Greg Egan are testament to the power of "going it alone".

    I'm in the middle, and in all honesty, wringing my hands a little bit. On the whole though I respect the approach of backing every technology at once -- may the best man win!

    Comment Source:John mused: > Since I have no pride, I wouldn’t mind joining Khan Academy and posting our stuff there… I've been thinking about this a lot. Not necessarily Khan Academy.. but to use your recent 4D series on Google+ as an example, all of the visual material there was made freely available at no expense (either to you, or the cause of 4D geometry in general!) It is a balancing act to decide whether to expend effort to provide infrastructure like the Khan Academy has ourselves, or to gain leverage from the efforts of others. Staffan for example has been keen to utilize the latest served-hosted interactive 'notebooks' from the SAGE community. On the other hand Jim Stuttard is aligning himself with a smart set of Haskell libraries on his own server. Some of your more established friends like Greg Egan are testament to the power of "going it alone". I'm in the middle, and in all honesty, wringing my hands a little bit. On the whole though I respect the approach of backing every technology at once -- may the best man win!
  • 15.

    Allan wrote:

    It is a balancing act to decide whether to expend effort to provide infrastructure like the Khan Academy has ourselves, or to gain leverage from the efforts of others.

    As you say, we'll just have to wing it, worrying about it a lot but not being quick to make dumb decisions. Taking a really strong 'go it alone' stance could box us in, but we seem to have 'go it alone' members who like to make things themselves, from wiki pages to wikis to servers to Petri net software... so if this is the dynamic, maybe we need to provide a good environment where that can flourish.

    I'm gonna try SAGE notebooks as a way to get my 90 differential equation students, mostly math majors, to solve some ordinary differential equations. Cross your fingers. Even if this goes down in flames, I'll learn something (and them too).

    Comment Source:Allan wrote: > It is a balancing act to decide whether to expend effort to provide infrastructure like the Khan Academy has ourselves, or to gain leverage from the efforts of others. As you say, we'll just have to wing it, worrying about it a lot but not being quick to make dumb decisions. Taking a really strong 'go it alone' stance could box us in, but we seem to have 'go it alone' members who like to make things themselves, from wiki pages to wikis to servers to Petri net software... so if this is the dynamic, maybe we need to provide a good environment where that can flourish. I'm gonna try SAGE notebooks as a way to get my 90 differential equation students, mostly math majors, to solve some ordinary differential equations. Cross your fingers. Even if this goes down in flames, I'll learn something (and them too).
  • 16.

    Thank you for the information. CCNA Course

    Comment Source:Thank you for the information. <a href="https://anynote.co/read-blog/4340">CCNA Course</a>
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